Female Staff In Coffee ShopThis morning 100 million Americans began their day in the same way—drinking their first cup of coffee.¹ Few, if any, took a moment during this morning ritual to contemplate or marvel the complex journey that brought their coffee from farm to kitchen table.

Coffee is the U.S.’s largest food import.² It wields an economic impact that starts with farmers from Brazil to Vietnam and ends with the barista at your local coffeehouse, involving hundreds of truckers, shippers, roasters and retail workers in between.

The beans brewed for your morning coffee may have changed hands up to 150 times. And the original bean farmer can expect between 10 to 12 cents of every dollar spent on retail coffee.³

Like many agricultural enterprises, coffee is grown on large plantations and small farms alike. Harvests are purchased by coffee mills located proximate to coffee growing regions, either directly from the plantation and farm cooperative, or via a trader who buys from the farmer in the hopes of re-selling at a higher price.

The mills take these “cherries”—so called because the beans are red—and brings them through a milling process that dries them and removes their husks to reveal the inner green bean.

The green beans are brought into the U.S. by importers and sold to roasters and major coffee brands whose roasting facilities are typically located in coastal cities with seaports that can receive the coffee shipments.

Once roasted, coffee will be ground (or left as whole beans), packaged and shipped to distribution centers around the country for eventual delivery to retail outlets.

Coffee’s journey to your table may travel a different path given the rise of specialty roasters and a growing connection between coffee retailers and farmers that removes many of these middlemen.

As you get ready for the holiday season, consider all the paths that merchandise goes through when coming to you! Please let me know if you have any year end planning needs and have a happy holiday season!

1. StatisticBrain.com, May 17, 2015
2. Globalexchange.org, May 8, 2014
3. PBS.org, May 2014
The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG, LLC, is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and materials provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2015 FMG Suite. Securities and advisory services offered through National Planning Corporation.(NPC) Member FINRA, SIPC, and a Registered Investment Advisor. Trilogy Financial Services and NPC are separate and unrelated Entities.


About Your Columnist

Windus Fernandez Brinkkord windus2is a featured columnist for Women Taking Charge, the official blog of Connected Women of Influence, where she covers the intersection of women in business and managing their investments and taking charge of their financial future. Currently, Windus is Senior Vice President of Investments with Trilogy Financial Services, a financial services company that focuses on helping business owners and individuals build and manage wealth.

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